100% pure natural essential oils pre-blended massage oils    find us on facebook                                                                          the world of pure essential oils
member of the CTFA 
caucheteux approved quality
 
guaranteed quality of pure essential oils

Click here to Shop in South Africa (Suid Afrika)

International (Rest of the World) shoppers Click here

 

Home
Contact us
Shopping security


INFORMATION

OTHER

Mongongo oil

This unique African oil is beneficial because of its content of linoleic acid (between 30% and 54%) the derivatives of which synthesized by the body form part of the composition of cell membranes. Mongongo oil therefore has hydrating, regenerating and restructuring properties and in addition, and due to the presence of eleostearic acid which reacts rapidly with UV light producing polymerization.

mongongo tree

on this page

Botanical classification of Mongongo mongongo oil

The botanical name is Schinziophyton rautanenii and is also known as Manketti. The mongongo is a deciduous nut-bearing tree measuring 7 – 20m tall and 1.5cm in diameter. The large branches grow at a gentle angle to the ground and the tree can be easily climbed making them a favorite playground for children. The wood is pale yellow and is similar to balsa, being both lightweight and strong. It has dark green hand-shaped leaves and small whitish-yellow flowers. The tree leafs in October, and then flowers and begins to bear fruit.

The green fuzzy fruit is somewhat plum-like and falls from the trees from April to May, maturing on the ground. Under the skin is a narrow spongy layer, at first green and pleasantly aromatic to taste, then turning brown with maturity when the flesh softens and develops its sweet date-like flavor. Elephants and Kudu feast on the sweet fruits and produce the 'nuts' cleaned of the fruit. Kudu regurgitate the nuts some time after eating the fallen fruit, leaving them in neat piles, ready for collection while elephants defecate the nuts, which can be picked up from their dung.

The Mongongo tree grows on seasonal drylands, surviving unreliable rains and temperatures ranging from 14º F in winter to well over 100º F in summer. It is found in abundance throughout coast to coast across Southern Africa – where it occurs in large groves: some running for several kilometers.

Traditional uses of Mongongo mongongo oil

Mongongo fruit and nuts are commonly consumed by local people in Zimbabwe, Zambia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, Mozambique and Malawi and is a staple food amongst the San bushmen of northern Botswana and Namibia.

The seeds are roasted and then cracked – this removes the hard outer shell but leaves the inner shell intact which helps to keep kernels clean until they are required for later use. The outer shell is extremely tough and difficult to crack. This has proved a major barrier to commercial exploitation of the mongongo nut but has preserved this excellent food source for the indigenous people of Africa.

The white kernel is similar to a small hazelnut, which tastes much like roasted cashews or almonds. After roasting, the kernel turns butterscotch brown and takes on a cheesy flavor. The dried, crumbly flesh of old fruit is edible for as long as eight months. Some bushmen remove the flesh from the fresh fruit, dry it in the sun, and store it for use later in the year.

Properties of Mongongo oil mongongo oil

The kernel has a protein content of about 25%, and a fat content of about 50%. It has a high vitamin E content - around 560mg per 100 grams of kernel. The nutritional content of the kernel is outstanding. The kernel is 57% fat, and of this, about 43% are polyunsaturated (almost entirely linoleic acid), about 17% saturated fats (palmitic and stearic), and about 18% monounsaturated (oleic).

The kernel contains calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, zinc, thiamine, riboflavin, nicotinic acid, and high concentrations of vitamin E (almost entirely as g-tocopherol). Due to the very high g-tocopherol content, the oil is very stable, and does not become rancid in the African heat.

As previously stated, Mongongo oil is beneficial for topical use because of its content of linoleic acid (between 30% and 54%) the derivatives of which synthesized by the body form part of the composition of cell membranes. Mongongo oil therefore has hydrating, regenerating and restructuring properties and in addition, and due to the presence of eleostearic acid which reacts rapidly with UV light producing polymerization.

 

essential oils
Headings of links underneath

 

Use of essential oils

 


Links to essential oils, carrier oils and specialized pre-blended oils
Allspice
Aniseed
Basil
Bay
Benzoin
Bergamot
Black pepper
Cajuput
Calamus
Camomile
Camphor
Caraway
Carrot seed
Cassia
Cedarwood
Chamomile
Cinnamon
Citronella
Clary sage
Clove
Coriander
Cypress
Dill
Eucalyptus
Fennel
Frankincense
Galbanum
Geranium
Ginger
Grapefruit
Helichrysum
Hyssop
Jasmine
Juniper
Labdanum
Lavandin
Lavender
Lemon
Lemongrass
Lime
Mandarin
Marjoram
Melissa
Myrrh
Myrtle
Neroli
Niaouli
Nutmeg
Orange
Origanum
Palma rosa
Patchouli
Peppermint
Petitgrain
Pimento
Pine
Rose
Rose geranium
Rosemary
Rosewood
Sage
Sandalwood
Spearmint
Spikenard
Tagetes
Tangerine
Thyme
Tea tree
Vetiver
Ylang-ylang
ESSENTIAL OILS
NOT SOLD BY US
Angelica
Baobab oil
Marula oil
Birch
Bitter almond
Boldo
Buchu
Cardamom
Cumin
Elemi
Lemon verbena
Mugwort
Mustard
Pennyroyal
Rose otto
Rue
Sassafras
Tansy
Tarragon
Savin
Thuja
Tuberose
Vanilla
Wintergreen
Wormseed
Wormwood
Yarrow Muscle & Joint
Relaxation
Sensual
Anti-cellulite
Circulation
Hair & Scalp
Dry & Mature Skin
Insomnia
Baby
Vein & Artery
Uplifting and Grounding
OTHER OILS
Rosehip oil
Neem oil Almond oil
Aloe vera oil
Apricot kernel oil
Avocado oil
Calendula oil
Evening primrose oil
Grape seed oil
Hazelnut oil
Jojoba oil
Olive oil
Wheatgerm oil
CARRIER OILS
NOT SOLD BY US
Macadamia oil
Pumpkin seed oil
Sesame oil
Safflower oil
Sunflower oil
Walnut oil

 

Recipes

 

Safety with essential oils

 

Related articles

 

Manufacture of essential oils

 

Holistic and alternative medicine

 

Treatment of ailments with essential oils

  • If you are suffering from any medical condition please contact your licensed medical practitioner.
  • The treatments listed below relies on alternative healing with essential oils, and please note that no clinical trials or results are available and rests heavily on anecdotal proof.
Abdominal pain
Abscess
Acne
Addictions
Anal fissures
Athlete's foot
Bad breath
Bedsores
Bleeding
Bleeding gums
Blepharitis
Blisters
Boils
Breathing difficulty
Bronchitis
Bruises
Burns
Carbuncles
Catarrh
Chapped lips
Chilblains
Circulation
Cold sores
Colds
Conjunctivitis
Constipation
Coughs
Cuts
Diarrhea
Diverticulosis
Dysmenorrhoea
Ear infections
Fainting
Fever
Flu
Frostbite
Gingivitis
Grazes
Halitosis
Hay fever
Headaches
Heart palpitations
Heartburn
Hiccups
High blood pressure
Influenza
Insect bites
Insomnia
Jetlag
Laryngitis
Leg cramps
Lumbago
Mouth ulcers
Nausea
Neuralgia
Nosebleed
Pneumonia
Shock
Sinusitis
Sore throat
Splinter
Sty
Swollen ankles
Toothache
Varicose veins
Wounds

pci dss compliant
website and shopping security
sallamander concepts
Ageless herbal products
Agelesshealth International herbal and essential oils products
Agelesshealth South African herbal and essential oils products
Sanitoets home test kits and testing strips

 

 
  HOME 

American and international orders    South African orders

Contact us Shipping information     Security information on website and shopping cart
Index of essential oils      Search our site      Treating ailments with essential oils
Dilution rates      Ways to use essential oils     Links      Sitemap
Terms and Conditions / Site Information and Copyright

© Copyright Sallamander Concepts (Pty) Ltd 1998 - 2019.
 

The entire content of this website is copyrighted - including text, photographs, logos, metatags etc., and no part whatsoever may be copied and used - privately, for educational purposes or publishing or for commercial application - without the written permission of Sallamander Concepts (Pty) Ltd.

Unauthorized copying or use of any of our copyrighted material may result in both criminal and civil action.

 

Our site is kept current and was last updated 5 December 2019.